If You Don’t Know Where to Start…

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As much as I would like to go about normally scheduled programming these days, it’s absolutely impossible to ignore what is going on in our country right now.

I don’t have the words. Change is extremely uncomfortable but I am hoping and praying that we are on the brink of major historical change in this country.

Social media has chosen today as Blackout Tuesday, with nearly every account I follow posting only a picture of a black square in place of their normally uniquely created content.

This movement, incited by the death of George Floyd, has morphed into more than a police vs. blacks issue to an Anti-Racism ideal. It is not enough to be purely “not racist.” We must actively continually educate ourselves, acknowledge white privilege, as well as both stand up and speak up for blacks in order for a societal change to occur.

My dear friend, Candace Read, recorded a 5 minute video that is undoubtedly worth your time that discusses how this conversation has room for all different types of voices, discusses how racism can result in PTSD, and urges us to not judge another’s heart by their actions. Again, definitely worth your time. Her words are always beautiful and this video is no exception.

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CA4AJo3g7Th/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet

I also have found this list to be comprehensive and educational for resources for white people to educate themselves on anti-racism. Being white, I understand, I will never understand but there is always more to learn.

Here is a list of 31 children’s books that support conversations on race, racism, and resistance. Our youth deserve to be educated on this topic. They need to learn how to socialize and cooperate with all different types of people, especially ones that are not within their own culture.

Two books for adults that have come from reader recommendations as well as ones I’ve seen being very popular on all resource lists are White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo and How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi.

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